ACYS 2010 > News & events > Archive > June 2012 > Education programs for Indigenous Australians about sexually transmitted infections and bloodborne viruses

Education programs for Indigenous Australians about sexually transmitted infections and bloodborne viruses

As a group, Indigenous Australians experience poorer health outcomes than other Australians, including in the area of sexual health. The Closing the Gap Clearinghouse looks at sexual health education programs as a way of promoting sexual health for Indigenous Australians. Original article

Australian (illicit) drug policy timeline updated

The Australian (illicit) drug policy timeline now provides a list of key events, policy and legislative changes that have occurred in Australia between 1985 and March 31st 2014. Original article

17 Apr 2014

Number and rate of young people under youth justice supervision drops

A report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) shows the number and rate of young people under youth justice supervision in Australia has dropped in recent years, but Indigenous young people continue to be over-represented. Original article

17 Apr 2014

Government welcomes business commitment to help young job seekers

The Australian Government has endorsed the commitment by major Australian businesses to help address youth unemployment. Original article

17 Apr 2014

Skate parks get a good behaviour tick

Researchers at The University of Western Australia have found that skate parks are actually more likely to promote good behaviour - yet skate parks are often under threat from community opposition because of fears that young people who congregate at them will engage in anti-social behaviour. Original article

15 Apr 2014

Study finds videogames do not negatively impact adolescent performance

Flinders University researchers analysed data from more than 192,000 students from 22 countries and found that contrary to a popular view that increased videogame play can affect academic performance and concentration among teenagers, it in fact had little impact on exam results. Original article

15 Apr 2014

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