ACYS 2010 > Sector resources > Research > A-D > Age and sexual assault during robberies

Age and sexual assault during robberies

Published in Evolution and Human Behavior

April 2011, online July 2011

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090513811000419

We use data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System to examine the effects of offender and victim age on whether male offenders commit sexual assault while robbing women. Restricting analyses to robberies reveals the offenders' age preferences since it allows one to control for the effects of opportunity. We find that robbers of all ages are most likely to sexually assault women at ages 15–29 years, ages when their reproductive potential is highest. However, in contrast to the idea that rape is a direct adaptation, victims are no more likely to be raped than sexually assaulted at these ages. The age of the offender is also a strong predictor of sexual assault. The likelihood that a robber commits a sexual assault increases from age 12 years until he reaches his early thirties when it begins to decline. This age pattern corresponds, to some extent, to age differences in the male sex drive.


Exploring the issue of violence among young males in Australia

An article in The Conversation looks at the reasons why young men continue to behave violently in urban areas, and the culture of male violence generally. Original article

31 Oct 2014

Read about how important mobile phones are to our teens

The vast majority (89%) of 14–17-year-olds have mobiles; young people talk candidly about what they use them for. Original article

31 Oct 2014

CPR should be taught in schools

Young people are not immune from heart problems; a leading cardiologist would like to see CPR as part of the school curriculum so that more lives can be saved. Original story

31 Oct 2014

UN report card on young people makes for grim reading

UNICEF has just released a report card about child wellbeing in 41 countries, and the effected of the economic crisis in Europe have been marked for children and young people although Australia did relatively well. Original story

31 Oct 2014

Children of the recession: the impact of the economic crisis on child well-being in rich countries

This UNICEF report shows that 2.6 million children have sunk below the poverty line in the world’s most affluent countries since 2008, bringing the total number of children in the developed world living in poverty to an estimated 76.5 million. Original article

30 Oct 2014

  More news >