ACYS 2010 > Sector resources > Research > A-D > Age and sexual assault during robberies

Age and sexual assault during robberies

Published in Evolution and Human Behavior

April 2011, online July 2011

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090513811000419

We use data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System to examine the effects of offender and victim age on whether male offenders commit sexual assault while robbing women. Restricting analyses to robberies reveals the offenders' age preferences since it allows one to control for the effects of opportunity. We find that robbers of all ages are most likely to sexually assault women at ages 15–29 years, ages when their reproductive potential is highest. However, in contrast to the idea that rape is a direct adaptation, victims are no more likely to be raped than sexually assaulted at these ages. The age of the offender is also a strong predictor of sexual assault. The likelihood that a robber commits a sexual assault increases from age 12 years until he reaches his early thirties when it begins to decline. This age pattern corresponds, to some extent, to age differences in the male sex drive.


Australian (illicit) drug policy timeline updated

The Australian (illicit) drug policy timeline now provides a list of key events, policy and legislative changes that have occurred in Australia between 1985 and March 31st 2014. Original article

17 Apr 2014

Number and rate of young people under youth justice supervision drops

A report released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) shows the number and rate of young people under youth justice supervision in Australia has dropped in recent years, but Indigenous young people continue to be over-represented. Original article

17 Apr 2014

Government welcomes business commitment to help young job seekers

The Australian Government has endorsed the commitment by major Australian businesses to help address youth unemployment. Original article

17 Apr 2014

Skate parks get a good behaviour tick

Researchers at The University of Western Australia have found that skate parks are actually more likely to promote good behaviour - yet skate parks are often under threat from community opposition because of fears that young people who congregate at them will engage in anti-social behaviour. Original article

15 Apr 2014

Study finds videogames do not negatively impact adolescent performance

Flinders University researchers analysed data from more than 192,000 students from 22 countries and found that contrary to a popular view that increased videogame play can affect academic performance and concentration among teenagers, it in fact had little impact on exam results. Original article

15 Apr 2014

  More news >