ACYS 2010 > Sector resources > Research > E-H > Family involvement in adolescent substance abuse treatment and recovery: What do we know? What lies ahead?

Family involvement in adolescent substance abuse treatment and recovery: What do we know? What lies ahead?

Families represent the most important resources that young people have in their journey through treatment toward recovery. Unfortunately, family members are often seen as part of the problem and not as part of the solution to adolescent alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment and recovery. This attitude and misperception can be changed through education, outreach, and engagement of family members. Family involvement and creating a parent-professional collaborative partnership is a step toward improving the outcomes for adolescents in need of treatment and recovery. It is crucial that families understand the treatment process, as well as the hope, process, and reality of recovery. Without information families may not understand the importance of a treatment and recovery plan for their adolescent, the potential adverse consequences, and the impact of these AOD problems on other family members. Families need to learn the continuum of services and supports available, and how family participation improves treatment outcomes and strengthens the recovery process. Family involvement should be an essential part of intake, treatment, and recovery planning, as well as the foundation for effective parent–professional partnerships.

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740911002301 

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