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Youth, Crime and the Media

Youth, Crime and the Media: Media representation of and reaction to young people in relation to law and order
Edited by Judith Bessant and Richard Hil
Hobart: National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1997.
ISBN 1 875236 38 4 (pbk) 234 pp.
($38.50)

Youth, crime and the media

Youth, Crime and the Media is a valuable resource for anyone concerned with the ways the media represent issues relating to young people.

It is now widely accepted that the media play a central role in creating widely held images of young people. Most of these images emphasise problems like unemployment, gangs, crime, delinquency, drug use or homelessness.

  • Why are young people perceived as threats to social order?
  • How representative of youth involvement in crime are media portrayals of 'ethnic gangs', Aboriginal and Islander youth, disadvantaged, disabled or unemployed youth?
  • Are the media involved in constructing or exaggerating social problems involving young people, and if so, why?

To examine these and other questions, leading Australian researchers and commentators have contributed to Youth, Crime and the Media. They explore the ways in which young people are represented in the press, television, film and radio. Using case studies, the book demonstrates the ways in which young people are too often represented as a threat to law and order, morality or community standards, but also illustrates that the media can be used as an expression of youth culture.

This book will be of particular interest to:

  • youth, social and community workers, teachers, police and others working with young people;
  • media personnel, researchers and policymakers in all tiers of government;
  • students and academics in social science disciplines and media studies, and
  • young people themselves.