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ACYS calendar of events in the youth field

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Parenting: Young parents

SEMYA (South East Metropolitan Youth Action) is a WA youth service with a wide variety of online resources, including a section on Teenagers as parents.

NSW Young Parents Forum Series
OzProspect runs forums for young parents in partnership with the NSW Department of Community Services. See website.

Young Mothers for Young Women (YMYW): See: the YMYW website.

Talking Realities
This program trains and supports young parents to become peer educators. The project is based at the Adelaide Central Community Health Service, The Parks, and is a division of the Central Northern Adelaide Health Service. The project is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs under the Stronger Families and Communities Strategy's 'Local Answers' initiative, with additional funding from several other bodies. The project was developed with both an early intervention and a prevention focus. It aims to influence the health and well-being of young parents aged 19 years and under, and their children. The overall aim is to increase young parents' ability to make informed choices on parenting and health. Accredited peer education training and support from young parent peer educators is given to the young parents to increase their parenting skills, knowledge and capacity.

The Outcomes of children of young parents is a research study by the Social Policy Research Centre on the causal relationship between child outcomes and parental demographic characteristics, especially parental age at birth. There's been much concern about the impact of teenage pregnancy on child health and functioning outcomes but it isn't clear whether or not the poorer outcomes observed in these families are due to the parent's age at birth or to other factors, such as health and socioeconomic status of the parents, which influence both the likelihood of a teenage pregnancy and the outcomes for the child. (Researchers: Bruce Bradbury of the Social Policy Research Centre for the Federal Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs; http://www.sprc1.sprc.unsw.edu.au/researchabstracts.asp?ProjId=233).