Skip navigation

Username:
Password:

Need a password?

Cover (small) September 2008 Youth Studies Australia

Youth Studies Australia
VOLUME 27 NUMBER 1 2008

A new year, a new government, an apology. We are excited that youth is back on the agenda, and the Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies hopes to be closely involved in the strengthening of this nation?s commitment to the future of its young people.

We feel it is timely that the original research in these six papers focuses on serious youth issues that are of concern not only to researchers, but also politicians, policy-makers, service providers and the general public:

Feature articles:

The bleedin? obvious: Long-term support reconnects at-risk young people

by Alistair Lemmon

Youth Studies Australia, v.27, n.1, pp.9-16.

Summary:

Twenty young people with a history of incarceration, substance abuse and disconnection provided Whitelion with insight into ?what worked? in changing their at-risk behaviours. The answer was obvious ? state support beyond 18 years of age, perhaps until the mid-twenties. These young people require specialised intervention, and help accessing community structures, particularly jobs, which would ordinarily be out of reach. One program recommended as a viable model for Australian community organisations wanting to reconnect young people is the rigorously evaluated Job Corps program (USA), which integrates accommodation, long-term support and employability training programs.


Full text | PDF
(Subscribers only)

Youth homelessness 2006

by David MacKenzie & Chris Chamberlain

Youth Studies Australia, v.27, n.1, pp.17-25.

Summary:

The third national census of homeless school students, conducted in 2006, found that the number of homeless students had decreased since 2001. There were 9,389 homeless students in 2006 compared with 12,227 in 2001. Three groups were over-represented in the homeless population: Indigenous students, young people from single parent and blended families, and teenagers who had been in state care and protection. The number of homeless young people aged 12 to 18 decreased from 26,060 in 2001 to 21,940 in 2006. An increase in early intervention services appears to account for most of the decrease in youth homelessness.

Full text | PDF
(Subscribers only)

Financial management and young Australian workers

by Nicki Dowling, Lauren Hoiles, Tim Corney & David Clark

Youth Studies Australia, v.27, n.1, pp.26-35.

Summary:

In two studies of young Australian workers, participants generally displayed positive attitudes towards financial management practices; however, a substantial proportion failed to display positive financial management practices, experienced financial problems and dissatisfaction, and reported low rates of seeking financial assistance, particularly from professional sources. These findings highlight the need to identify the barriers that are impeding the translation of positive financial management attitudes into practice and to increase young workers? awareness of the potential benefits of seeking assistance when they are experiencing financial difficulties.

Full text | PDF
(Subscribers only)

Hanging in there: What makes a difference in the first year of an apprenticeship

by Angela Hill and Leanne Dalley-Trim

Youth Studies Australia, v.27, n.1, pp.36-42.

Summary:

A 2006 study of apprentices commencing with a Group Training Organisation in an Australian regional centre identified factors that appear to support apprentices in their first year. The research demonstrates that school subject selection and access to work-related experiences while still at school make an important difference to completion of the first year of an apprenticeship. Critically, however, first-year apprentices also require a supportive home life to offset negative work practices in some industry areas.

Full text | PDF
(Subscribers only)

The PATS peer support program: Prevention/early intervention for adolescents who have a parent with a mental illness

by John Hargreaves, Lyndal Bond, Matt O'Brien, Danielle Forer and Liz Davies

Youth Studies Australia, v.27, n.1, pp.43-51.

Summary:

PATS (Paying Attention to Self) is a peer support program for adolescent children of parents with a diagnosed mental illness. The program aims to promote positive mental health, reduce the likelihood of mental health difficulties, increase young people?s coping skills and empower them to meet their own and their families? needs. PATS combines peer support, group work, high levels of youth participation, a wide range of ongoing activities, and opportunities to develop useful life skills with lots of fun along the way. Central to the success of PATS is the belief that programs shaped by young people, for young people, will be attractive to young people.

Full text | PDF
(Subscribers only)

Playing for the future: The role of sport and recreation in supporting refugee young people to 'settle well' in Australia

by Louise Olliff

Youth Studies Australia, v.27, n.1, pp.52-60.

Summary:

The Centre for Multicultural Youth Issues (CMYI) held a series of consultations and forums in 2007 to explore the role of sport and recreation in supporting refugee and migrant young people to ?settle well? in Australia. This article presents some of the findings documented in Playing for the future (Olliff 2007), the discussion paper that emerged from those investigations. The potential benefits and problems associated with the use of sport and recreation in this context are discussed and recommendations made for future areas of research.

Full text | PDF
(Subscribers only)