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Each quarter, our peer reviewed journal publishes up to six research- and practice-based articles on Australian youth. Find out more about Youth Studies Australia.

June 2009 cover (tiny)

Media release

11 June 2009

Youth Studies Australia
v.28, n.2, June 2009

June 2009 cover

Published by the Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies

* How do GPs react when faced with a young person requesting the pill?
* Does the Victorian human rights charter work for young people?
* What should providers look for when funding youth work?
* What works when mentoring young people from the Horn of Africa?
* Can we deal with cyberbullies at TAFE?
* Do young people learn anything from music?

EDITORIAL

Research that matters

Terry Bartholomew and Judith Bessant both contribute papers that consider the contested area of young people's rights. Terry looks at young people's rights in a specific but crucial area of their lives - their interaction with GPs - while Judith examines the impact of the new Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities on young people's rights in the state of Victoria.

Judy Bruce and her fellow authors from New Zealand describe research that provides a means of evaluating youth work, while Megan Griffiths and her fellow authors discuss their research which will help mentoring providers tailor programs for Horn of African young people. These papers have policy implications for all levels of government in Australia and New Zealand.

Our fifth paper looks at cyberbullying from the perspective of TAFE students and finds that while cyberbullying is less prevalent at TAFE than in schools, it still causes distress and disruption and needs to be addressed.

The final paper discusses the use of music therapy with refugee ESL students and with young men excluded from mainstream schooling. Further research may confirm the benefits of music therapy for a range of young people, particularly those who are vulnerable and at risk.

FEATURE ARTICLES

1. How general practitioners determine young people's rights
by Terence Bartholomew
In this research, 300 doctors in Victoria were asked to make decisions about a hypothetical patient's competence and confidentiality. It appears that assumptions embedded in relevant law, the vague nature of existing legal criteria and the diversity in assessment practices all have the potential to act as obstacles to young people's claim to rights in the medical context.
Youth Studies Australia, v.28, n.2, 2009, pp.5-13.


2. Reasonable limits and exemptions: Victoria's human rights charter and its implications for young people
by Judith Bessant
Many people had great expectations of the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities when it came into effect in January 2008. However, Judith Bessant asks whether the provision for seeking exemptions from the charter has undermined its capacity to effectively counter age-based discrimination and, paradoxically, permitted practices that clearly breach the basic human rights of young people.
Youth Studies Australia, v.28, n.2, 2009, pp.14-22.


3. Youth work that is of value: Towards a model of best practice
by Judy Bruce, Kim Boyce, Jono Campbell, John Harrington, Duane Major & Ange Williams
How do funding providers make informed decisions about funding youth work programs and services? One provider in New Zealand commissioned a group of participant-researchers to explore the question 'What is youth work of value?' and then develop a model of best practice. The findings have implications for both youth work practitioners and funding providers.
Youth Studies Australia, v.28, n.2, 2009, pp.23-31.


4. Culturally appropriate mentoring for Horn of African young people in Australia
by Megan Griffiths, Pooja Sawrikar & Kristy Muir
Little is known about how to appropriately adapt mentoring programs for young people from the Horn of Africa, even though they have been arriving in Australia in significantly increasing numbers. These young people face unique challenges as a result of their age, ethnicity, migration and direct/indirect trauma experiences. The results of this research will help mentoring providers appropriately tailor programs for Horn of African young people.
Youth Studies Australia, v.28, n.2, 2009, pp.32-40.


5. Cyberbullying: A TAFE perspective
by Barbara Reeckman & Laine Cannard
TAFE discipline procedures only apply to cyberbullying events that occur on campus, but this study found that some online incidents occurring off campus affect young people's experience of TAFE and students wanted staff to deal with them. Unlike conventional bullying, it appears that young people think cyberbullying shouldn't be defined by specific physical locations.
Youth Studies Australia, v.28, n.2, 2009, pp.41-49.

6. Music for engaging young people in education
by Carmen Cheong-Clinch
Two music programs were developed specifically to meet therapeutic objectives for newly arrived immigrant and refugee students and for adolescent boys in a residential care facility. The author's observations justify further research to establish whether music can support and nurture the social, physical and mental wellbeing of young people, particularly those who are vulnerable and at risk.
Youth Studies Australia, v.28, n.2, 2009, pp.50-57.


Media inquiries and further information
Sue Headley
Editor and Production Manager, Youth Studies Australia

* P (03) 6226 2591
* F (03) 6226 2578
* E [email protected]