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Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies
Vol.10 n.1 Autumn 1991

AIDS: The consequences for young people

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1

The Youth Research Centre report in this issue discusses the prospect that HIV/AIDS may pose a significant threat to the health of all young people in the future. The third report in the 1989/1990 series of YRC research reports, prepared for the Victorian Youth Affairs Division, Lifelong, Incurable and Fatal: Young People, AIDS, and Government Response provides an overview of Australian research on HIV and its relative significance for young people, and outlines the implications for government policies.

Lifeskills in the classroom: Preparing students for their future,
by Robert B Burns

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1 p44-49

The move from an industrialised society to an information society necessitates a rethinking of the curriculum in its function of preparing young people for their future. The author says that though the old basic skills are still necessary, we need to add to them the new basic skills - Portable Life Skills - that can be applied in a rapidly changing world of work, and that career guidance must be reformed to emphasise the development of a variety of skills and adaptable personalities.

Swedish youth: Undermined through overcaring?,
by Amanda Seller

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.12-16

Sweden is the ultimate caring welfare state. Committed to equal opportunities, generous in its funding of minority groups, liberal in outlook, its social system is the envy of the caring professions in other countries. So how do you explain Sweden having one of the highest rates of alcoholism and suicide in Europe - especially among its young? Amanda Seller attended a Swedish youth conference to find out exactly how young people are cared for by the Swedish welfare state and at what price.

The Swedish way and youth research: An Australian perspective,
by Bruce Wilson

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.17-19

Bruce Wilson finds that despite a commitment to social equity in Sweden, there is concern over manipulation and control of young people and a lack of interest among young people themselves in social participation.

Adolescents and HIV/AIDS: Risky business,
by Doreen A. Rosenthal & Susan M. Moore

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.20-25

The risk of HIV infection for Australian adolescents is real. This article draws attention to three issues which bear on adolescents' vulnerability to HIV infection. * adolescents have different beliefs about risk with casual or regular sexual partners, underestimating the latter, and behave accordingly; * characterising adolescents as a homogeneous group fails to take account of the variety of adolescents' experiences and beliefs about sexual matters, and their differing responses to the threat of AIDS; * there is a worrying gap between intentions regarding the practise of safe sex and actual behaviour. This gap must be closed if good intentions are to lead to safer sex. If we are to develop effective AIDS education programs, say the authors, we must take account of youths' different constructions of their sexual world.

Youth and the language of AIDS,
by Nicola Pilkinton & Dr Lawrence J Saha

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.26-31

Given the vulnerability of adolescents to HIV/AIDS, described in the previous article, there is an obvious need for educational programs directed to young people. Because of young people's differing attitudes, perceptions and behaviour, these programs must differ from those offered to adults and to other groups such as drug users, non-drug users, males and females. The effectiveness of existing programs remains inconclusive: some even highly successful in imparting appropriate knowledge, attitudes and behaviour intentions, while others have had little impact (Allensworth & Symons 1989). This article looks at one important factor which should be considered in development of HIV/AIDS - and argues that this language reflects the way young people understand, and so react to, the information that is being imparted.

Australia 2000: A shared challenge, a shared response,
by Phillip Hughes

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.36-43

As we approach the turn of the century we are naturally examining the past and attempting some vision of the future. The past is often looked at with either nostalgic yearning for its simplicity or with lamentations for mistakes and lost opportunities. When we contemplate the future (and even the present) there is often a perception of lack of control. We feel that society has reached a state of such rapid change that we cannot effectively make decisions or direct the future. In this essay Phillip Hughes looks at the changes and the increasing rate of change in our society, and makes the point that it is our young people who 'suffer disproportionately the effects of social change' and who consequently live in an environment of considerable stress. He calls for a strong commitment to the future and says we must decide what we value and then make choices which construct a future that does not exclude a major segment of the population from the opportunities of full participation in society.

Life skills in the classroom: Preparing students for their future,
by Robert B Burns

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.44-49

The move from an industrialised society to an information society necessitates a rethinking of the curriculum in its function of preparing young people for their future. Robert B Burns says that though the old basic skills are still necessary, we need to add to them the new basic skills - Portable Life Skills - that can be applied in a rapidly changing world of work, and that career guidance must be reformed to emphasise the development of a variety of skills and adaptable personalities.

The university student: Valued client or just another number?,
by Glenys Patterson

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.50-55

University resourcing is determined largely by the number of student enrolments. The extent to which university administrative practices are directed towards serving the best interests of this essential client group, the students, is examined in this study, which explores mutual perceptions and attitudes within the student/administrator relationship.

For practitioners: Small group process awareness: A field experience,
by David Goble

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.56-61

This article describes a 'money and life' camp attended by a group of Victorian teenagers in April 1990 in which a series of structured experiences was used in order to develop cooperation and group cohesion. Design issues are briefly discussed and attention is drawn to the need for highly developed intervention skills. Some problems that occurred during the camp are raised in the light of process issues and suggestions made as to how these may be overcome in future.

Characteristics of youth service users,
by Suzanna Omelczuk, Rod Underwood & Rob White

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.1, pp.62-66

In a 1989 survey of over 100 youth workers in Western Australia information was sought about the characteristics of service providers and users, the legal issues affecting young people who use youth services, and the response of youth workers to these issues. Presented here are the findings regarding the characteristics of young people using youth services (e.g. age, sex, employment status, ethnic background, and socio-economic status).