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Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies
Volume 10 n.2 Winter 1991

Youth and the media: Making waves,
by Howard Sercombe

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, vol.10,no.2, pp.11-15

Are juvenile crime waves the products of a society in crisis, or are they successful co-productions of the media, the policy and governments? Howard Sercombe suggests that while juvenile crime must be a legitimate concern at all times, we must also be alert to any claims of 'crime waves' and ask whose interests are being served in generating the moral panic that ensues.

How adolescents use the media,
by Judith Sachs, Prof. Richard Smith & David Chant

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.2, pp.16-20

Australian young people are very 'media literate' - they use all media forms and accept new technology with alacrity. Information about the time and frequency of use of these forms and technologies, as contained in the research reported on here, is an important starting point in understanding the influence of the media and the possible ways this media usage can be of benefit in the education and social development of young people.

Sun, sea, sand...and Salads? Nutritional messages on television,
by Heather Morton

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.2, pp.21-27

What nutritional messages are young people seeing on prime-time television? Given that the media are a major influence, how is that influence being used? This report suggests the news is not all bad, but there is still room for improvement.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles as war propaganda?,
by John Hillel

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.2, pp.28-33

Considerable public interest has focused on the craze for the cartoon series Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Most of this interest has focused on the issue of violence and the use of the program to promote toys and other products bearing the Turtles trade mark. Although the question of televised violence and its possible deleterious effects on young children is an important one, it may divert attention from other underlying meanings contained within this type of program. These meanings may ultimately be of far more significance and concern.

Young people, culture and popular music,
by Francis Cassidy

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.2, pp.34-39

Popular music and the extent to which it impacts on young peoples' lives is a complex subject and one that must be looked at in the context of the cultural processes at work in contemporary society. Francis Cassidy discusses here a number of these processes including the notion of hegemony, the role of the music industry and music and youth culture, and then explains why these are relevant to youth work.

Breaking Away,
by Helen Kambouridis

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.2, pp.40-45

This study looks at the factors which influence the occupational choices of adolescent girls from Greek and Anglo backgrounds - as mediated by maternal values. It considers why girls might expect to enter particular careers when ideally they may not want to.

Practitioner Focus: Defining the nature of youth work,
by Rob White, Suzanna Omelczuk & Rod Underwood

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.2, pp.46-50

This is the second of a two-part series, the first article of which described the social backgrounds of the young people with whom youth workers work (Youth Studies Feb 1991). In this paper the authors explore the nature of youth work as a particular form of intervention in the lives of these young people.

'Pioneering' and 'settling' activities of youth workers,
by Neville Knight

Youth Studies: Bulletin of the National Clearinghouse for Youth Studies, 1991 v.10 n.2, pp.51-55

It is argued here that the activities of youth workers may be usefully categorised as pioneering and settling, with the latter category being further divided into traditional and bureaucratic. He develops a typology based on Weber's ideas around these concepts, and using this typology, the goals and activities of three youth workers from Britain and Australia are examined on a case study basis.