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v.11 n.1, March 1992

Perceptions of the future: Australian adolescents and the Persian Gulf War,
by Cobie Knoblauch

Youth Studies Australia, 1992 v.11 n.1 pp.40-46

The beginning of 1991 produced a number of significant issues for Australian young people, not the least of which was the war in the Persian Gulf. Their world, in a country at peace, could no longer be considered a certainty. This study reports on a qualitative interview-based survey investigating the psychological impact of that war upon a sample of 27 Brisbane secondary students. The general aim of the research is to provide information about adolescents' views and concerns in relation to the war and the perceived effects upon their lives. The results of this study indicate that young people experienced war-associated personal and global concerns, and in some cases, feelings of helplessness and powerlessness.

Is Youth Policy really new?: A review of government policies affecting young people,
by David Pyvis

Youth Studies Australia, v.11 n.1, pp.14-18

This paper challenges the prevailing orthodox view that governments in Australia have only recently recognised a need to isolate and address youth as a distinct population. There is a long and sustained history of government interventions with youth and the author suggests that there is an enduring logic to the design of these youth-specific policies - that youth policy is and for a long time has been characterised by the recognition of youth as a potential resource or force of the state. But the paper goes beyond claiming that youth is simply utilised in the national interest and argues that the old govern the young largely in the interests of preserving their own power. The paper ultimately suggests that perhaps youth policy is not only not of recent origin, but is also not usually a form of benevolent intervention on behalf of youth. Rather youth policy is more commonly developed in the interests of its makers.

Adolescent suicide: Reports on work done in South Australia

Youth Studies Australia, v.11 n.1, pp.20-32

This is a three-part feature on adolescent suicide concerning:

  1. The effect on adolescents of the completed suicide of another student, by Graham Martin, Natash Kuller & Philip Hazell
  2. Postvention in a school, by Graham Martin;
  3. Imitation and the clustering phenomenon, by Graham Martin.

Suicide in isolation,
by Henry Lohse

Youth Studies Australia, v.11 n.1, pp.33-38

This paper is available for download in full text. It reports on and discusses an investigation into the suicide and attempted suicide records in Broken Hill over the past 15 years, highlighting the differences to national trends, suggesting some local influences and offering recommendations for the future. While the research does not focus specifically on youth, the data for that age group and the possible social factors contributing to suicide make this research relevant to those interested in the problem of youth suicide.

Core Curriculum development: Youth Sector Training Council

Youth Studies Australia, v.11 n.1, pp.39 and 62

This is the first in a series of articles on the Core Curriculum Development Project which will appear regularly in Youth Studies Australia over the coming months. Future articles will deal with specific issues related to the development of a nationally accredited core curriculum for workers with young people.

Perceptions of the future,
by Cobie Knoblauch

Youth Studies Australia, v.11 n.1, pp.40-46

The beginning of 1991 produced a number of significant issues for Australian young people, not the least of which was the war in the Persian Gulf. Their world, in a country at peace, could no longer be considered a certainty. This study reports on a qualitative interview-based survey investigating the psychological impact of that war upon a sample of 27 Brisbane secondary students. The general aim of the research is to provide information about adolescents' views and concerns in relation to the war and the perceived effects upon their lives. The results of this study indicate that young people experienced war-associated personal and global concerns, and in some cases, feelings of helplessness and powerlessness.

Aids update: The gap between knowledge, attitudes and behaviour,
by Louise Sullivan

Youth Studies Australia, v.11 n.1, pp.47-49

The importance of HIV/AIDS education in schools, and sex education in general, has gained momentum over the last five years. The following represents the research trends of international and national researchers whose work focuses on adolescence. This review concentrates on the areas of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in general - there are other important areas of research that are not addressed here, such as disabilities and migrant research. It is also important to note that the issue of the relationship between knowledge, attitudes and behaviour is highly contentious and is by no means resolved.