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Undervalued, expensive and difficult: Young women talk about motherhood
JaneMaree Maher
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.11-16.
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Youth, hope and cultural creatives: Possible conceptual connections
de Sales Turner
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.17-23.
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Australian adolescents' perceptions of their parents: An analysis of parenting styles, communication and feelings towards parents
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Youth homelessness: Four policy proposals
Chris Chamberlain and David McKenzie
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.32-38.
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'On Track' to what? A Foucauldian analysis of a recent Victorian postcompulsory education policy initiative
Annelies Kamp
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.39-44.
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Social change and youth partnership accountability work
Kathleen Stacey, Emma Webb, Kelly Barrett, Nina Lagzdins, Desima Moulds and Paul Stone
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.45-51.
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Photovoice: Promising practice in engaging young people who are homeless
Matt Dixon and Morgan Hadjialexiou
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.52-56.
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Article summaries:

Undervalued, expensive and difficult: Young women talk about motherhood
JaneMaree Maher.
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.11-16.
There has been considerable public debate in Australia around falling fertility rates; however, the voices of young women have not been prominent in these debates. JaneMaree Maher presents 16 young women's views of motherhood. Their positive views about the value to society of motherhood sit alongside pragmatic concerns about managing mothering and other life aspirations. Their thinking, especially in regard to the social and economic costs of motherhood, is influenced by observations of contemporary women 'doing' motherhood.

Youth, hope and cultural creatives: Possible conceptual connections
de Sales Turner
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.17-23.
Young people today face a number of significant challenges to their physical, emotional, social, psychological and cultural integrity. This qualitative study explores the phenomenon of hope in 10 young people, with the aim of establishing whether young Australian people see personal hope as crucial to their well-being and survival. The findings of this study are not generalisable to all Australian youth. However, they do provide some insights into the participants' views on hope, and clearly demonstrate its importance in their lives.

Australian adolescents' perceptions of their parents: An analysis of parenting styles, communication and feelings towards parents
Renae Endicott and Poppy Liossis
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.24-31.
Researchers have begun to acknowledge the importance of asking young people about their experience of parenting, yet critical gaps still exist in this area of knowledge. The current study compared styles of parenting with how Australian adolescents' perceived parent-adolescent communication and how they felt about their parents. The results suggest there are some marked differences between the four parenting styles in terms of how Australian adolescents perceive parental communication quality and how they feel towards their parents.

Youth homelessness: Four policy proposals
by Chris Chamberlain and David McKenzie
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.32-38.
Using data from four sources, Chris Chamberlain and David MacKenzie argue for the need for policies to build on existing 'good practice' in regard to early intervention for youth homelessness. The policies proposed involve the expansion of the Reconnect program; a pilot adolescent community placement program; the coordination of early intervention services and national benchmarks for student welfare in schools.

'On Track' to what? A Foucauldian analysis of a recent Victorian postcompulsory education policy initiative
Annelies Kamp
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.39-44.
Drawing on research findings, this article attempts an 'eventalisation' of the implementation of On Track, a recent initiative in Victorian postcompulsory education policy. Annelies Kamp argues that On Track can be understood as an act of surveillance that not only manages but also produces a risk that is deemed manageable by government. While there is a growing recognition of the need to understand youth transition in late modern times as being a 'recursive state', the governance framework persists in constructing youth transition as partaking of panoptical time that compels us to attend to progress, precocity, arrest, or decline through initiatives such as On Track.

Social change and youth partnership accountability work
Kathleen Stacey, Emma Webb, Kelly Barrett, Nina Lagzdins, Desima Moulds and Paul Stone
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.45-51.
Social change is challenging to achieve in community and youth sector contexts and may be supported or obstructed by agendas, agency and discourse, among other things. As a specific form of youth participation, youth partnership accountability (YPA) has a primary focus on the accountability of workers and agencies to young people through proactively addressing agendas, young people's agency and discourse. The main discourse(s) present within community and youth sector activities, that is, ways of talking and determining meanings, may enable or prevent social change that is liberating and respectful of young people and their agency.

Photovoice: Promising practice in engaging young people who are homeless
Matt Dixon and Morgan Hadjialexiou
Youth Studies Australia, v.24, n.2, June 2005, pp.52-56.
Matt Dixon and Morgan Hadjialexiou present a creative approach to engaging young people who are homeless in health promotion activities and planning. They share their findings from a pilot project in Melbourne involving young people taking photographs as a means of communication and self expression. Programs and practice Promising practice in engaging young people who are homeless.